Why Employees Quit their Work

Why Quit an Organisation:

Whatever the root cause, there is usually a moment of “disengagement,” which may or may not be followed by an employee’s immediate departure. Whether it takes weeks, months or years for an employee to finally go, from that moment on, the employee is less committed, less enthusiastic and less likely to be bringing a top game to work.

Reasons why employees quit their work:

Y    Employee expectation does not match the work

Y    Mismatch between job and person

Y    Less advancement and growth opportunities

Y    Unrecognization

Y    Stress from overwork

Y    Work-life imbalance

Y    Loss of trust and confidence from superiors

Y    Feeling not motivated

Y    Restrictive work environment

Y    Barriers to peak performance

Y    Work overload

Y    Less wage

Y    Lack of Autonomy and Respect

Y    Lack of Health Benefits

Y    No Job Security

Y    Arbitrary and unannounced relocation

Y    Strange HR practices.

Y    Lack of teamwork

Y    Poor communications

Y    Unclear objectives and goals

Many human resource executives spend a great amount of time and money investigating the causes of employee turnover, particularly through exit interviews. The objective is to find out why people leave. If a company can identify the reasons for terminations and departures, the theory goes, it can remove some of the causes for employee dissatisfaction. There are, however, two shortcomings with this traditional practice:

What causes inertia? Two factors inside organizations and two factors outside make people stay: job satisfaction and satisfaction with the working environment. These factors produce the internal inertia and are directly affected by the positive or negative correlation between the employee’s personal value system and that of management.

A disparity between personal and organizational values reduces the desire to stay, while compatibility between these two values increases the desire to stay.

Improving employee retention will be more effective over the long run than the ordinary, negative approach of simply reducing turnover. The key is improving attitudes about the work itself, supervisor competence, confidence in the fairness of management, work group cooperation, consistency in treatment, feedback about performance, opportunities to get ahead, and other positive aspects that relate to the work context. Work content factors—those aspects of the job inside the organization—include pay, benefits, facilities, attendance rules, and other environmental aspects.

External factors are

Y    job opportunities,

Y    the community,

Y    financial obligations,

Y    family ties,

According to Dr. Charles Hughes of the Center for Values Research, Dallas, TX the combinations of external and internal factors influencing employees’ job decisions, employees can be identified as one of four types:
job
Turnovers

They are not happy with their jobs, have few external reasons to stay, and will leave at the first opportunity. Employees may not start out in this position, but a gradual erosion of their inertia causes them to slide into this area.

Turn-offs

They are candidates for unions and employee relations and productivity problems. These employees have negative attitudes about their jobs and stay because of golden handcuffs. They may feel they are too old to start over again and are locked in by benefit programs and high rates of pay. Productivity may suffer.

Turn-ons

They have positive attitudes and remain with the company almost exclusively for reasons associated with the work itself. From management’s point of view, as well as the individual employee’s, this situation is the most desirable. If management actions lower attitudes and the positive, work-related reasons to stay, turnover will probably jump. Because the turn-ons are not affected by environmental factors, they will not stay without continual job satisfaction.

Turn-on plus

These employees are likely to stay for the long run because they have work and environmental satisfaction. A short-term drop in satisfaction does not lead to resignation. If attitudes drop permanently, however, these employees become turn-offs. This does not raise turnover, but increases employee relations problems.

The external factors increasing inertia include perceptions of other job opportunities and personal and family reasons. Some employees stay because they like the schools or the neighborhood, but what if both of these deteriorate and become less appealing? Other job opportunities become more attractive.

Other employees report they stayed in an unpleasant job because they could not leave the community in which they or their spouses were born and had lived most of their lives. Despite low job satisfaction, they stayed.

Many people will be late to the office and excuse themselves by telling
some common causes like:

Y    getting children ready for school or day care slowed them down

Y    blame traffic or the weather, and

Y    fell asleep again

Y    Functions etc

Improving employee retention will be more effective over the long run than the ordinary, negative approach of simply reducing turnover. The key is improving attitudes about the work itself, supervisor competence, confidence in the fairness of management, work group cooperation, consistency in treatment, feedback about performance, opportunities to get ahead, and other positive aspects that relate to the work context. Work content factors—those aspects of the job inside the organization—include pay, benefits, facilities, attendance rules, and other environmental aspects.

Conclusion

Employees are the asset of an organization.Frequent qiuting of an organization will affect the goodwill of an organization.Thus it is the organization responsibility to retain their employees.



Source by R.Manju Shree

Category: Online Jobs

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